Premier Class…

1 04 2010

Whilst sitting here fuming that the plumber which visited this morning to simply tighten a pipe has somehow managed to remove any hot water from anywhere other than the kitchen, I thought I would do what I promised a few days ago and write a blog on the Premier League and my expectations for the last few matches.

Lets start at the top. Chelsea will win it, Man Utd will come second and Arsenal third. I don’t like the idea of Chelsea winning it particularly, but they simply seem to have the legs whereas Man Utd and Arsenal seem reliant upon inspiration from individuals. The injuries to Rooney and Fabregas severely hamper their respective teams and their title challenges. Arsenal have no-one to suitably replace Fabregas, and the nearest pretender, Ramsey, is crocked for the long term too. For United, the loss of Rooney is a big blow, and whilst Berbatov has shown recently that he is good enough to replace Rooney, there are, for me, question marks as to whether he can provide as much inspiration and clinical finishing that Rooney does. Man Utd do not need a player to drift in and out of matches like Berbatov does, instead they need players to grab the game by the scruff of its neck and win them. Berbatov only does this in part.

For me Chelsea are looking like they are getting stronger, and with no European competition to worry them, the league becomes the priority. Add to this the bonus that their key men (of which, unlike their rivals there is more than one) are not getting injured in Europe but instead are getting stronger and better, and the only conclusion is that they will regain the title.

In the race for fourth, I still think Liverpool will just about get there. The two-man team that is currently the Anfield side is showing signs of significant improvement, and looking at their remaining fixtures, it is, realistically, only the penultimate game of the season which they should lose. All the rest are matches they need to, and should, win if they want that fourth spot. Compare this with Man City who still have to play Man Utd, Arsenal, Villa and Spurs. Or Spurs themselves who have Arsenal, Chelsea and Man Utd, as well as City. Villa, for me are slipping away, and are out of contention altogether for a fourth placed spot. I just think that the Liverpool bandwagon is finally gathering some momentum this season, and given the return to form of Gerrard, and the return to fitness of Torres, I wouldn’t bet against them coming fourth and winning the Europa League.

And so to the bottom, where it increasingly seems like two from three will accompany Portsmouth into the Championship. Strangely it is not Hull or Burnley for who I fear, but the increasingly agitated West Ham. In-fighting and, today, ¬†out-fighting, are blighting the club in its attempts to stay in the league. The sounds coming out of the board-room, and from the manager make it seem like the club is struggling behind the scenes, and the remaining fixtures seem to suggest that it could be hard for Zola’s men to pick up many (if any) more points. Wigan and Sunderland are their best hopes, although a Fulham team distracted by the Europa League may also play into their hands. However, if they need points on the last day of the season, then a trip to Man City (who may still be fighting for fourth) is the last thing Zola would want.

As for Burnley, the match against Hull in a couple of weeks is vital for their chances, but three games against top-six opposition may render that result meaningless. Add to that an away trip to St Andrews, and you fear for their chances of picking up anything more than five points. Which may be enough, but it seems unlikely. This would leave them on 29 points.

On paper, Hull have a slightly easier run in, but have no ‘dead certs’. Most of their matches are against teams in the top half of the table, and whilst they may fancy themselves to pick up some points, I cannot see it being more than three or four. If this is the case, Hull would finish with 31 points.

This would mean West Ham would need roughly five more points to stay up, but looking at their fixtures, I’m not confident. It may even come down to goal-difference which decides who stays up. Either way though, West Ham look like they are in trouble.

Of the teams above them, I’m delighted to think that my team, Wolves, as well as Bolton and Wigan are all but safe from relegation. The recent spell of four games unbeaten has done wonders for the Wolves team, and whilst realistically we cannot expect that to continue against Arsenal on Saturday, it has launched us clear of the drop zone, with a bit of a cushion. If we add that together with the healthy goal difference advantage we have over Wigan, then things are looking up.

So, whilst I think the “big-four” monopoly over the Premier League will continue for now, it will not be without one hell of a fight. And the outlook for Portsmouth is bleak, certain relegation, financial collapse, and players looking disillusioned with the club mean that the tunnel for them seems very dark and very long. For Burnley or Hull relegation would not be the end of things, I think that their respective promotions came perhaps too early for the club, and the financial windfall provided should see them build and develop as football clubs as well as teams. Relegation could be a problem for West Ham, without the Premier League’s cash, and with a rush of key players likely to leave, as well as the manager, the tunnel is likewise pretty dark for them too. However I think it’s significantly shorter for them, and some sound investment over the next few years and I think they would be back stronger if they got relegated.

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Accountability…

7 05 2009

This weeks Champions League semi-finals, traditionally two of the most engaging matches in the season, have been overshadowed by two very poor referees performances which ruined the ties.

On Tuesday Manchester United overcame Arsenal with consumate ease at the Emirates stadium. Yet it could have been so different had the referee, Roberto Rosetti, not awarded a series of free-kicks for very small offences. Indeed, the cheap free-kick that Ronaldo won to score Manchester United’s second goal on the night, should not have been given. Through the course of the night he was poor and was not consistant in anything other than his own incompetence.

As if Tuesday wasn’t bad enough, Wednesday was worse. The scenes at the end of the Chelsea-Barcelona tie were disgraceful, yes, but understandable too. Now I dislike Chelsea and the way the club has destroyed football. That said, they had every right to be aggrieved as the referee, Norweigan Tom Ovrebo, missed at least three clear penalty claims for Chelsea.

The consequence of the lack of decisions have been depicted on the back pages of every newspaper across the country. The words of Didier Drogba have reverberated around sporting websites and sporting commentators. The anger of Michael Ballack, the frustration of Guus Hiddink and the disappointment of Frank Lampard have all been recited by the press. There is one person we haven’t heard from though. That of Ovrebo. Apparently he has been told by UEFA not to make any press comments, something which is sure to fan the flames more than it dampens them.

I have written about this before, but referees need to be made accountable. At the moment the thing that frustrates the fans and players more than the decisions made is that the referees do not seem to be accountable for the decisions? Any punishment that comes the referee’s way is negligable and out of the view of the public. Referee’s get away with poor performances as they do not have to publically account for their decisions. Yes, UEFA will probably stop him refereeing any further matches in the Champions League, but that is too little to cover the loss of the match on which so much rested.

Drogba himself will undoubtedly be punished for his words, and it is likely that Ballack will also face UEFA scrutiny. The players are not allowed to speak about the referees without fear of punishment, and this is wrong. If other players can be criticised by opposing players and managers, why can referees not? It causes so many problems, and many could be aided should referees simply be made accountable for their decisions. If they were to give interviews after the match as managers do, perhaps many of their decisions can be explained in public, rather than the private report they submit to the respective authority.





Football Thoughts…

19 04 2009

It’s been a busy week for football this week. As I’m now sat watching the second FA Cup semi-final instead of finishing an essay, I thought I would do at least some writing.

Yesterday’s semi-final between Arsenal and Chelsea was an interesting tie. Won late on by Didier Drogba, the tie was played in the shadow of the Hillsborough tragedy (of which I have previously written), with presentations made to members of the Hillsborough families. The teams were meant to play wearing black armbands as a sign of respect. Yet Arsenal played the first half armband-less. Which was a point of criticism undoubtedly. Until Chelsea came out in the second half, without their armbands. They did, it appears, somehow jump onto the Arsenal players arms at half-time. This seems both bizarre, and slightly disrespectful. Was there only one set of black armbands at Wembley yesterday? I had always thought that the armbands were little more than black tape, so why would there need to be ‘proper’ bands? Did the FA simply forget the second set of bands? Whatever way you look at it, only having one set of armbands is distinctly unprofessional from the FA, and two teams could have simply made do with the traditional tape, as opposed to apparently sharing the armbands.

Secondly, briefly, I’m becoming more and more convinced that the next Manchester United manager will be David Moyes, who, to my mind, has many of the same traits as Sir Alex Ferguson, and who has proven himself consistantly with hardly any money at a high standard.

Finally, I cannot finish a football related blog on this day without mentioning the success of my own team. Wolverhampton Wanderers have been promoted to the Premier League two games before the season ends. Barring any freak results, they will go up as Championship Champions too. It has been a roller-coaster season, our autumn was brilliant, our winter less so. Our spring has been necessarily strong, and our summer will be exciting. Sitting atop the league since October, Wolves have proven themselves to be the best team, scoring the most goals and having the league’s top scorer in our ranks. Congratulations to Wolves, and here’s hoping for a solid season next term!